Guidelines for Traditional Penitential Practices

Deus Vult

Well-Known Member

Guidelines for Traditional Penitential Practices


Traditional rules of fast and abstinence as outlined in Canons 1250-1254 of the 1917 Code of Canon Law.



Who was bound to observe these laws?

+ The law of abstinence bound all Catholics,
beginning on the day after their 7th birthday.

+ The law of fasting bound all Catholics, beginning on the day after their 21st birthday
and ending at the midnight which completed their 59th birthday.
[Note: The USA's particular law has lowered the obligatory fasting age to 18.]


What was forbidden and allowed to be eaten?

+ The law of abstinence forbade the eating of flesh meat and of broth made of meat,
but did not exclude the use of eggs, dairy products, or seasonings made from
the fat of animals.

+ The law of fasting prescribed that only one full meal a day was taken with
two smaller meals that did not equal the main one.



In the Universal Church

Abstinence was obligatory on all Fridays,
except on Holy Days of Obligation outside of Lent.

Fasting and complete abstinence were obligatory on the following days:

Ash Wednesday
Fridays and Saturdays in Lent
Good Friday
Holy Saturday
Ember Days
Vigil of Pentecost
Vigil of Christmas


Partial Abstinence
Disciplinary Laws of fast and abstinence are able to be, and have been, changed by the Church. Serious obligation now exists only on Ash Wednesday and Good Friday. On Fridays during Lent, other penances must be undertaken if the former fast and abstinence are omitted. It is strongly recommended, because we all need to do penance, to voluntarily observe the laws of fast and abstinence as they were formerly.

See also text of Archbishop Lefebvre's sermon on fasting & abstinence:
http://cor-mariae.com/index.php?posts/6043/
 
Last edited:

Deus Vult

Well-Known Member
Subtle changes to the SSPX calendar:

Years ago, the SSPX calendars always referenced the 1917 Code of Canon Law. As ABL never used anything else, the SSPX, as dutiful sons, always followed his counsels.

If you look at the 2010 calendars and years forward, they make it very prominent, giving the guidelines on Fasting and Abstinence using the 1983 Code of Canon Law of the Conciliar Church!
In the newer calendars – number 1) states: “The law of Abstinence binds all Catholics, beginning on the day after their fourteenth birthday.” - The bold and italics is theirs on the calendar.

Compare this with 1917 law: “The law of Abstinence bound all Catholics, beginning on the day after their seventh birthday.”

On the bottom half of the newer calendars, it begins to explain the 1917 code but very insignificantly.

For example, in the upper half of newer calendar are all the details of the 1983 Code of fast & abstinence laws and are numbered in bold with 1 & 2 making them stand out. Somewhere in the bottom half it a begins to explain the old code but the fast & abstinence laws are not numbered to stand out, they only marked with a bullet character. When you look at it all and if unaware there was a law before 1983, the convert or younger person will tend to accept the 1983 law as the only one that ever was.

In the older calendars there is one simple, short paragraph, explaining the disciplinary laws of the Church regarding fast & abstinence. This is how it read:

Disciplinary Laws of fast and abstinence are able to be, and have been, changed by the Church. Serious obligation now exists only on Ash We. and Good Friday. On Fridays during Lent, other penances must be undertaken if the former fast and abstinence are omitted. It is strongly recommended, because we all need to do penance, to voluntarily observe the laws of fast and abstinence as they were formerly.

The paragraph above and the details for Fast and Abstinence of the 1917 Code requirements were sufficient as that's all the information that Traditional Catholics needed and wanted to know anyway. It was so much simpler, and at the same time, did state everything but eliminated any possible confusion. Anyone who wanted to know about the 1983 Code could ask a Priest, or contact a N.O. Church.
When I study the Catechism, I want to read and learn the old Catechism. I don't want to be reading and learning at the same time the Traditional catechism and the new catechism. Not to say someone can't be aware of and know the differences between the two. However, that would be a separate study and not in the same book.
 
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