Choy

Admin

Administrator

I purchased choy plants that are pictured thus:





......thinking I would get this:



I cannot see how the second will grow from the first.

It is the first time I have grown choy I have no idea how this vegetable develops and would appreciate your advice. Does the second grow from the first and how??????????
 
D

Deleted member 149

Guest
Those are some interesting pictures of Choy. I had never grown any of those Asian cabbages; though they are highly nutritious.

I also did a Smartpage.com search of Choy. I discovered that there are many different varieties of Choy. Your bottom picture looks like a Choy sum; unlike a Bok Choy that looks very similar.

I wonder if the seed packet labeling given to you was in a general form and not specific in its Latin variety.

I know when I order heirloom seeds, I constantly have to cross check with customer service to make sure there is not a "typo" on their website; which does happen.

Also, like many other vegetables, when they begin to flower like that, it is when the edibleness of the leaves are giving off its energies and sugars to produce its flowers to go to seed (or fruit); which is why they taste bitter afterwards. Then after the seed stage, the plant redirects all of its energy to the root system preparing for winter dormancy.

When plants do flower, it is a good time to choose and label which of those plants you want to harvest seed for next year. Or you can let them go and "volunteer" to propagate themselves in the same spot; if your soil is still balanced.

Choy, butter, garlic, onion, and water chestnuts is a delicious Asian dish. Mmm...

 

Admin

Administrator
Machabees said:
Those are some interesting pictures of Choy. I had never grown any of those Asian cabbages; though they are highly nutritious.

I also did a Smartpage.com search of Choy. I discovered that there are many different varieties of Choy. Your bottom picture looks like a Choy sum; unlike a Bok Choy that looks very similar.

I wonder if the seed packet labeling given to you was in a general form and not specific in its Latin variety.

I know when I order heirloom seeds, I constantly have to cross check with customer service to make sure there is not a "typo" on their website; which does happen.

Also, like many other vegetables, when they begin to flower like that, it is when the edibleness of the leaves are giving off its energy to produce its flowers to go to seed (or fruit); after, then redirecting its energy to the root system preparing for winter dormancy.

Choy, butter, garlic, onion, and water chestnuts is a delicious Asian dish. Mmm...
It is all quite beyond me Machabees! I, too, thought the flowers might be detracting from the growth of the actual formation of the vegetable so I had trimmed them off on a couple of plants, but they just flowered again. I'm wondering if one actually uses the flowers????? Is that, in itself, the choy???? Also, I planted them as seedlings, not seeds.
 
D

Deleted member 149

Guest
Admin said:
It is all quite beyond me Machabees! I, too, thought the flowers might be detracting from the growth of the actual formation of the vegetable so I had trimmed them off on a couple of plants, but they just flowered again. I'm wondering if one actually uses the flowers????? Is that, in itself, the choy???? Also, I planted them as seedlings, not seeds.
Trimming off flowers is a good strategy to prolong the prolific growing season; but it has to be very early in the bud stage, or the plant chemistry would have begun its converting process.

Also, taking buds off of young fruiting trees that was just newly planted is also a long time strategy; so that all of the energies throughout the growing season can go to the root system in order to be a stronger and healthier tree for the following year to produce; along with proper pruning.

There are a lot of how-to videos on Youtube showing this technique.

 
Top